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My Salinger Year

My Salinger Year
My Salinger Year
My Salinger Year
My Salinger Year
My Salinger Year
My Salinger Year
AUSTRALIAN PREMIERE SEASON NOW SHOWING
My Salinger Year
Rather delightful. Weaver is brilliant, portraying her character with dry wit and evident relish.
David Stratton
THE WEEKEND AUSTRALIAN
A coming-of-age story told with a sophistication that only makes it all the more touching. Falardeau has captured all of the book’s charm, producing a trip into the recent past with a slightly gentler atmosphere than the one which prevailed during the buccaneering 'Mad Men' decades, the tag end of an era in which publishing and journalism still preserve a sense of history. In recalling her youth, Rakoff is revisiting a time which has a nostalgic glow attached to it for anyone remotely interested in the power of the written word.
A wonderful film, a real charmer! The most holiday-friendly title of summer. A gentle, thoughtful film about ambition, talent and a young woman’s entrance into an adult world. The friendships and romances never play out in predictable ways. The very talented Philippe Falardeau, who made the attentively compassionate Monsieur Lazhar, has a warm-heartedness and eye for character that serve him well. A delight.
Weaver and Qualley both convince. As in the film 'The Devil Wears Prada' (also about a glamorous but misunderstood industry), this is about the desire to retain ambition and hope and yet balance it with realism and resilience. Falardeau's 'Monsieur Lazhar' (2011) was an under-seen gem and here he once again allows the well-observed human sentiments and particularities of character to anchor the film.
A triumph! Towering turns from Sigourney Weaver and Margaret Qualley are the driving force in this affectionate true-life tale. From the moment Weaver appears on screen in power suit, cravat and dashing white Anne Bancroft streak, you suspect that it’s going to be fun. And she doesn’t disappoint. It’s one of the roles of her career.
Kevin Maher
THE TIMES
A warmly understated homage to the publishing world that captures the exciting palpitations literature and writing inspire.
Nicholas Bell
ION CINEMA
Falardeau’s gentle adaptation of Joanna Rakoff’s elegant and much-loved memoir is full of charm and intelligence, deftly capturing a world that has sadly vanished.
Joseph Walsh
THE ARTS DESK
A superb, intelligent, brilliantly conceived coming of age story, marked by a series of stellar performances. A life affirming elixir for those yearning for quality adult cinema.
Alex First
2GB
Director: Philippe Falardeau
Cast: Margaret Qualley, Sigourney Weaver, Douglas Booth
Duration: 101mins
M
Coarse language and sexual references
Rather delightful. Weaver is brilliant, portraying her character with dry wit and evident relish.
David Stratton
THE WEEKEND AUSTRALIAN
A coming-of-age story told with a sophistication that only makes it all the more touching. Falardeau has captured all of the book’s charm, producing a trip into the recent past with a slightly gentler atmosphere than the one which prevailed during the buccaneering 'Mad Men' decades, the tag end of an era in which publishing and journalism still preserve a sense of history. In recalling her youth, Rakoff is revisiting a time which has a nostalgic glow attached to it for anyone remotely interested in the power of the written word.
A wonderful film, a real charmer! The most holiday-friendly title of summer. A gentle, thoughtful film about ambition, talent and a young woman’s entrance into an adult world. The friendships and romances never play out in predictable ways. The very talented Philippe Falardeau, who made the attentively compassionate Monsieur Lazhar, has a warm-heartedness and eye for character that serve him well. A delight.
Weaver and Qualley both convince. As in the film 'The Devil Wears Prada' (also about a glamorous but misunderstood industry), this is about the desire to retain ambition and hope and yet balance it with realism and resilience. Falardeau's 'Monsieur Lazhar' (2011) was an under-seen gem and here he once again allows the well-observed human sentiments and particularities of character to anchor the film.
A triumph! Towering turns from Sigourney Weaver and Margaret Qualley are the driving force in this affectionate true-life tale. From the moment Weaver appears on screen in power suit, cravat and dashing white Anne Bancroft streak, you suspect that it’s going to be fun. And she doesn’t disappoint. It’s one of the roles of her career.
Kevin Maher
THE TIMES
A warmly understated homage to the publishing world that captures the exciting palpitations literature and writing inspire.
Nicholas Bell
ION CINEMA
Falardeau’s gentle adaptation of Joanna Rakoff’s elegant and much-loved memoir is full of charm and intelligence, deftly capturing a world that has sadly vanished.
Joseph Walsh
THE ARTS DESK
A superb, intelligent, brilliantly conceived coming of age story, marked by a series of stellar performances. A life affirming elixir for those yearning for quality adult cinema.
Alex First
2GB

OPENING NIGHT GALA – 2020 BERLIN INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

The much-anticipated new film by Academy Award®-nominated writer/director Philippe Falardeau (Monsieur Lazhar), MY SALINGER YEAR unites three-time Oscar®-nominee Sigourney Weaver and radiant new talent Margaret Qualley (Once Upon A Time… in Hollywood) for a hugely enjoyable adaptation of Joanna Rakoff’s internationally bestselling memoir about a young woman’s literary education.

It’s the mid-90s: idealistic twenty-something Joanna (Qualley) impulsively quits graduate school and arrives in New York to pursue her dream of becoming a published poet. She manages to get her foot in the door, landing a coveted role as assistant to Margaret (Weaver), a brusque and old-fashioned literary agent. Joanna’s life soon fluctuates between poverty and glamour – her days spent in plush, strangely anachronistic wood-panelled offices where dictaphones and typewriters still reign and agents doze after three-martini lunches – and her nights in the sinkless Brooklyn apartment shared with her socialist boyfriend (Douglas Booth).

The agency’s most famous client is the notoriously reclusive writer J.D. Salinger, and Joanna’s principal responsibility is to process the voluminous fan mail that arrives for him daily from readers around the world. Her strict instructions are to reply with one of the office’s impersonal, pre-formulated responses, and destroy the letters, but she cannot help feeling deeply affected by some of the more heartfelt correspondence, and secretly starts answering them personally. As Joanna begins to discover her own voice, she puts everything else at risk…

Keenly observed and wryly funny, with whip-smart performances from its two indelible leads, MY SALINGER YEAR is a memorable and compassionate depiction of a pre-digital world on the cusp of disappearance, the value of mentorship, and the lasting impact of self-expression in all its forms.

My Salinger Year
AUSTRALIAN PREMIERE SEASON NOW SHOWING
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